Industry

Embracing Sustainability in the Workplace

Sunset Beach, San Diego - Photo permission of Tiffany Elbogen

Description:

It’s a smart business practice and the right thing to do. Find out how to implement sustainability solutions for your workplace. Gain practical information for yourself and your employees to begin on Monday morning. Brand your organization in the world of environmental stewardship. Your instructors will detail and deliver practical approaches and applications toward implementing sustainability with guidance in planning procedures.

Take back practical tips on operating your indoor environments to consider air, water, lighting, fitness, nutrition, mind and comfort. For anyone pursuing a career in a company or in government where there is an effort to build awareness and to gain a deeper understanding of the importance of environmental stewardship and overall social responsibility.

Agenda: One Unit introduced each week.
Unit 1: The Business Case for Sustainability
-Concepts of Triple Bottom Line: People, Planet, and Profit.
-The Return on Investment ( ROI )
-Human Capital Indicators and Employee Engagement
-Transparency for Stakeholders
-Reducing Energy Use Saves on the Bottom Line

Unit 2: An Internal Sustainability Plan
-Initial Assessment of Current Business Model
-An Office Task Force is Essential
-Designing a Mission Statement
-Basics on Environmental Accounting and Reporting
-Monitoring and Evaluation

Unit 3: Wellness in the Workplace
-New Value Proposition for Well Offices
-Wellness Concepts: Air, water, light, fitness, nutrition, comfort and mind
-Risk vs Reward of Wellness Features
-Sick Building Syndrome

Unit 4: Inner Company Initiatives That Work
-Office Procedural Strategies
-A Strategy for Resource Management
-Assessing Current Supply Chain and Purchasing Procedures
-Tools to Track Sustainable Products and Verify Healthy Purchasing
-Suggestions For Greening Your Office

Knowledge Level:

This course is intended as a introduction to sustainability practices in the work environment.

Program Design:

This instructor-led course is delivered on-line 24/7. Approximately 16 hours over a 4 weeks. Highly interactive with individual activities, group discussions and faculty feedback. Brand your organization in the world of environmental stewardship. Your instructors will detail and deliver practical approaches and applications toward implementing sustainability with guidance in planning procedures.

Learning Outcomes Related to The Business Case for Sustainability:

At the completion of this course you will:
1. Know how to engage staff and co-workers to concentrate on efficient environmental practices and to develop internal planning and policy procedures.
2. Have the ability to implement sustainable business procedures and policies with practical applications.
3. Know how to measure and monitor the effectiveness of company office sustainability procedures.
4. Be able to identify the benefits of implementing healthier building renovations, establish energy saving policies, develop greener purchasing, water and waste procedures and initiate green fleet initiatives.
5. Know how to apply practical approaches and resource conservation measures that affect corporate culture.

Next available course:

• Monday, November 5 until Saturday, November 30, 2018.

• To register - go to YouGotClass/

Faculty

Kelly S. Gearhart

LEED Fellow, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, a Principal with Triple Green Building Group, a green building consulting firm with locations in the San Francisco Bay area, Savannah, Georgia and Sophia, Bulgaria. Gearhart is a USGBC LEED Faculty member, Instructor for the University of California, former Manager of Commercial Green Building Services at Southface Energy Institute, Inc. and has been involved with green building education, technical assistance, and leadership since 2005. Accredited in the new Building Design + Construction and Existing Buildings: Operations + Maintenance programs, she has taught over 50 full-day and multi-day LEED courses, facilitated seven full-day and multi-day green building charrettes, presented at 12 conferences, consulted with more than 100 clients on green building strategies and worked on 25 LEED registered and certified projects across the U.S. and internationally.

Kerry Mitchell

Has authored over 150 hours of content on sustainability planning metrics. She teaches employees, affiliates and stakeholders about how the metrics of sustainability will provide measurable results.

Contact us about your session questions today; we're happy to help!

Simple LMS for Firms and Associations

Many LMS systems add confusion

Description

The Simple LMS is based on the philosophy: start as simply as possible and grow as needed with just the features and structures needed. Thus, the Simple LMS is a bare­bones LMS system created on a capable and scalable CMS (Content Management System) platform.

A simple LMS can be built on Drupal 7, and so has hundreds of available modules that can be easily added, as needed, for functionality and expansion. Drupal is also easy to customize (using PHP and CSS) for features and functions that are too custom to be already available as modules.

This start-­simple philosophy assumes that three areas will all be growing and developing together, over time, at a rate dictated by the will and resources of the company:

  • the development of in-­house custom courses and materials;
  • the development of in­-house staff dedicated to staff development and company learning; and
  • the development of company policies, learning metrics, and process for learning paths.

Starting as simply as possible means that the company’s needs and direction will determine the growth and development of the LMS to match.

Knowledge Level:

This course is intended as introductory, and does not include any tutorial content for using specific LMS.

Program Design:

This instructor led session is designed to be delivered on-line in a 1 hour time frame, or in-person in a 1.5 hour interactive format. While there will be time for questions about specific networks, the focus will be on understanding the fundamentals, functions, comparing and contrasting various networks.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this program you will be able to:

1. List pro's and con's between a simple LMS and a feature-loaded LMS.

2. Explain the difference between SCORM import and export capabilities.

3. Outline a LMS policy for your organization with reasons for each decision.

4. Complete research for designing a simple LMS for your organization.

This Course is Recommended:

• Available online for individuals or small work teams.
• For Regional, State or local association events.
• To support a firm's or organization's internal curriculum.

No participant minimum required to book this session.

Faculty

Katin Imes is an experienced software developer, project manager, and a UX/systems designer. His passion and mission is creating access to the skills, tools, and knowledge that let people thrive in the Information Age. Specialties include: social networking software systems, online courses and LMS (Learning Management Systems), CMS (content management systems), online communities, e-commerce, Drupal, and Open Source. He has developed and managed web systems since 1996, the earliest days of the web, including server operations, hosting, security and encryption, e-commerce, and advanced back-end functionality.

Contact us about your session questions today; we're happy to help!

Cybersecurity for Small Businesses

Description

Cyber attack! It’s in the headlines nearly every day. Cybersecurity, or lack of is affecting thousands of business and individuals daily. We don’t all have the benefit of an IT department to protect our daily operations. What can you do to protect against a cyber theft affecting your monetary, operations, client information, or intellectual property? Learn to analyze potential cybersecurity threats and solutions that can be applied to your and business. Understand how to manage cybersecurity measures that are critical to maintaining your business operations and continuity. Determine how and when to call in law enforcement for cybersecurity issues. Identify action steps that can be taken to protect your data, designs and drawings from security threats and data breaches.

Knowledge Level:

This course provides and introduction and basic information to assist you in the cyber protection of your business.

Program Design:

This instructor led session is designed to be delivered on-line in a 1 hour time frame, or in-person in a 1.5 hour interactive format. While there will be time for questions the focus will be on understanding the fundamentals, functions, comparing and contrasting various scenarios.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this program you will be able to:
1. Correctly classify the type of attack as one of: physical, remote, phishing, malware, or social engineering - given an attack scenario.
2. Correctly classify the scenario as a primary data breach or not - given an information exchange context and scenario.
3. Design an example social engineering attack, including fictitious company, information target, sample script, and fallback exit.
4. Search online for resources (keywords, context) and identify which ones are appropriate / helpful for a given need, purpose or situation.
5. Differentiate various Shareware and social media - impact, importance and pitfalls.

This Course is Recommended:

• Online for individuals or small work teams.
• For Regional, State or local association events.
• To support a firm's or small business Talent Management efforts.
No participant minimum required to book this session.

Faculty

Katin Imes is an experienced software developer, project manager, and a UX/systems designer. His passion and mission is creating access to the skills, tools, and knowledge that let people thrive in the Information Age. Specialties include: social networking software systems, online courses and LMS (Learning Management Systems), CMS (content management systems), online communities, e-commerce, Drupal, and Open Source. He has developed and managed web systems since 1996, the earliest days of the web, including server operations, hosting, security and encryption, e-commerce, and advanced back-end functionality.

Overview of Managing Projects

Photo by T. Lowther, Biltmore, Asheville, NC

Description:

This is an overview that takes a fresh look at the demands and obstacles that design professionals will encounter when they work on their design projects. Savvy professionals with a desire to gain general knowledge and a understanding of project management will be better equipped to address the challenges arising out of new technologies, new codes, and third-party rating programs. Prepare for an hour of learning that can assist in managing the intricacies of projects while protecting profitability and reducing risks. If you are serious about changing your professional behavior you can finish the course with your own plan of action and a network of others with similar interest.

Knowledge Level:

This program is an awareness level program.

Course Design:

This program is designed to be delivered on-site or online in 1 hour. This program has been successfully delivered in a firm with multiple offices using a blended delivery approach. The program allows for Q&A and includes a personalized plan of action.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this program you will be able to:

1. Describe why Managing a Project is important to you as a professional using concepts expressed in this presentation.
2. Identify the project knowledge area where you have been the most successful and explain why.
3. List the project knowledge area where you need the most improvement and explain why.
4. Develop an action plan that includes how and when you will act to improve in the project knowledge area that you will identify as needing improvement.

This Course is recommended for:

* Individuals and project teams.
* Regional, State, and local association chapter events.
* To supplement a firm's internal curriculum.
* A product or service manufacturer'€™s internal staff training.

Faculty:

Thom Lowther, Ed.S.
On-site minimum of 10 participants required to book this session.
Contact us about your workshop questions today; we're happy to help!

Architectural Research Associates

The Emerging Blend of Degrees, Certification, and Professional Development: Impact on Higher Education

It about the degree, right?

Let me state my point of view of higher education upfront, I am focusing on the student who is interested in obtaining a college degree to improve their employment options. It may be the graduate student or it could be the undergraduate or the student in a community college or technical school that wants to get a promotion, a better position or a raise. Today, it is also more than likely that these are adult students. They have experienced the stress of a difficult economy and observed the rising cost of tuition. A record number of them have taken on student loans and many now face default. Higher education is about the degree, right? The degree has been the path to gaining knowledge, education and better employment. But tens of thousands of students and employers are questioning the perceived value of that degree.

Along came the Internet with free information. Today you can take free online courses from leading universities such as Stanford, Yale, MIT, Harvard, Berkeley and other colleges. Suddenly, what had been the exclusive domain of courses for the purpose of receiving college degrees becomes part of anyone’s opportunity for continuing professional development (CPD). But colleges cannot afford to give away their courses and expect to stay in operation. Community colleges, technical colleges and associations are offering certificates and certifications. These certificates and certifications are becoming widely recognized and accepted by professionals, employers and government agencies. Certification may show a demonstration of advanced knowledge, of a competency, and/or a skill. In some cases the certification has replaced the degree for that person who wants to get that promotion, the better position or a raise and the cost of a certification is generally much less that the college degree.

So, what might we expect for higher education? Well, the college degree is not going to go away. Society still values the college tradition, the credibility and trust the college degree. Most colleges will increase their online education programs and online course offerings. For example, the Boston Architectural College offered the first online Sustainable Design degree and their colleges are searching for their niche. Schools will increasingly offer certification programs and the courses that support those programs. Schools will increase the number of partnerships they develop with professional, technical, and trade associations as well as related businesses and industry. Pratt Institute for example, partners with the International Facilities Management Association (IFMA). offering IFMA credential programs using Pratt IFMA certified faculty.

Two major expenses for a college, the campus and the faculty and online education affect both areas. Online education allows the college to expand their reach to students globally without greatly expanding the cost of a facility or an instructor. Partnering with a business or industry and setting up a satellite facility in an office is becoming a common practice. Online education expands the college faculty’s reach globally, 24/7. The online instructor can offer a lecture to hundreds or thousands at a time. It would be similar the professor offering a class lecture in a large auditorium while discussion groups make it more personalized for the student.

The Emerging Blend of the Degree, the Certification, and Professional Development: The overview

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We often hear that change is constant. In yesterday’s issue of the Washington Post was an article on education, “An alternative to high-cost college?" A major focus of the article was about how start-up companies are providing free or low priced programs are designed to compete against the expense of a college degree program. This article is yet another statement about the current assault on the expense of obtaining a degree in higher education and the perceived value of that degree. While the Post article focused mainly on higher education, this is just the tip of the transition. There is a related larger issue that needs our attention, the emerging blend of college degrees, certificate and certification programs, and continuing professional development.

In their book, Nine Shift that was published in 2004, the authors William Draves and Julie Coates introduced to us the changes that were beginning to occur in our society because of the acceptance and use of the internet. They described changes that were just beginning to occur in our approach to work, in our life styles, and in our approach to education. As the Washington Post article describes the situation, we are now well into the middle of the transition described in Nine Shift. So, where are we now? What'€™s the current landscape?

Related to formal education MIT, Harvard and others have used the internet to design a new education landscape. The Washington Post article sited MITalong with other universities as pioneers for offering open courseware. To date there are more than 15,000 online open courses provided by more than 250 institutions. Suddenly, what had been the exclusive domain of courses for the purpose of receiving college degrees become part of anyone'€™s opportunity for continuing professional development (CPD). In their association'€™s official publication, Training + Development, the American Society of Training and Development (ASTD) indicated that in 2010 more new online courses were being developed by companies than traditional classroom courses. Online companies such as Ron Blank, RedVector, AECDaily, Saylor.com, P2PU are using college faculty to develop and on offer online CPD. And don'€™t forget McDonald'€™s Hamburger University or the Disney Institute.

Throw into the mix a few online certificate or certification programs offered by associations, community colleges and technical schools. Suddenly the lines between degrees, certifications, and professional development begin to blur. You now have a real conundrum. How do you sort through what I refer to the "€œterrible T's" - Turf, Trust and Tradition. Who is supposed to offer what to whom? Who can you trust? And, who are these people – have they ever offered education before?

So, what’s next? What can we expect? In the upcoming series of the “emerging blend of college degrees, certificate and certification programs, and continuing professional development” we will offer papers specific to the impact on higher education, associations, firms, product manufacturers and the workforce.

The 6th Key for a Product Manufacturer: Implementation and delivery of continuing education

For the product manufacturer, the first rule of implementation and delivery –keep it simple and follow your action plan. One strength of the product manufacturer is their product research department. The big question is how do they use that information when delivering education? Add to their research, the product manufacturers are in a prime position to develop project studies or case studies about actual application. Where so many product manufacturers slip up, they run their client continuing education programs from their marketing department using their sales force as the trainers. It is difficult to be an effective trainer if your income is based entirely on what you sell. An answer to this problem –rule number two is to have your technical staff deliver the education to your clients. Team them with a sales staff if you must but then structure their salary to reflect that some of their time is spent in education marketing and not direct sales.

Here is an example of one company that has learned to design and deliver product education correctly,Pella Windows, Commercial Division. In 1989 Pella hired an architect, Terry Zeimetz, AIA, CSI, CCPR to design and teach architects and engineers about their products. Based upon adult education principals and clear learning objectives Terry incorporated Pella’s research and developed courses slowly over time that were based upon projects related to the architects and engineers needs. These education courses were not sales pitches. Pella was patient and gave their plan time to develop and unfold. They built their program around their research and ongoing need assessments. Because of a solid foundation, by the time they reached the implementation and delivery phase the process went reasonably smooth, it grew and continues today. Terry was not afraid to try the new and the different, something that connected to Pella’s strategic education plans. Pella’s on-site education and product tour has become the standard for offering site tours for the industry.

A Key 5 ROI: Unifying Marketing and Promotion thru Social Media

Flickr photo by UW Digital Collections

Last February one of our staff, Jacob Robinson convinced me and several others that we should join him and several marketing and sales folks from FedEx Services for dinner at a local Georgetown restaurant. As it turned out, not only was it a great dinner but perhaps one of the more significant business learning experiences that I have been exposed to in a long time. The social conversation turned from advertisements during the Super Bowl to exposure to the type of information and education that many senior executives would pay handsome sums to experience. Our host for the evening was William Margaritis, Senior VP Global Communication & Investor Relations, FedEx. FedEx has been regularly ranked in the top 10 on the FORTUNE magazine “World’s Most Admired Companies” and “Best Places to Work.” Under his leadership, the FedEx communications program has been recognized as “best-of class” in the discipline of reputation management.

Blog contribution by Jacob Robinson, Curriculum Development Manager at the Green Education Foundation.

Social media has become a buzz term that we hear talked about in our offices and see written about in news and blogs nearly every day for the past couple of years. “How to Maximize Social Media in Your Firm” or association or something similar is a common title for blogs and articles that seek to provide strategies on embracing social media in a holistic and meaningful way. Yes, social media is in. It’s hip. Everyone is talking about it and everyone is doing it. In other words, “If you’re not there; you’re noticeably absent,” as a 2010 study by FedEx Corporation stated. Companies and organizations everywhere on the planet are participating in social media in one way or another, with many continually increasing their annual budgets for such programs in both external and internal communications.

However, be wary of the rewarding temptation to only use social media as a promotional tool; while you may see an ROI of views, retweets, and hits, this limiting output could put your company at risk of relying too much on brand. As companies like FedEx and Southwest Airlines are successfully showing best results come from fully integrating social media into your promotions and your marketing business plan. Even for smaller organizations, it is paramount to understand that social media is a two-way street, whether B2C or B2B, your level of engagement (including follow-ups to posts and tweets) is a key factor to successful implementation. With social media, you have at your hands a powerful set of tools to show the world the culture of your business, not just what products and services your business provides, but who you are as an organization. Through these means, you can effectively promote your education program and build brand reputation leading to customer loyalty and business strength.

I want to end by first thanking Mr. Margaritis for a wonderful evening, both entertaining and educational. You have an excellent sales and marketing staff in the DC area. And next, I would like to thank Jacob Robinson for writing this blog and convincing me that the business dinner would be much more valuable than just food and wine. Best of luck Jacob on your new position!

The Fifth Key for the Product Manufacturer to Offer Successful Education Courses: Marketing and Promotion

You will find that most successful product manufacturers have some form of internal professional development for their own staff. For this article I want to focus on the product manufacturers who provide education courses to their clients as part of a strategic marketing approach. Within the design, medical and financial fields the marketing department of a product manufacturer will arrange to offer education courses in a firm’s office, at the professional association local chapter office, and occasionally in a local hotel.

Those businesses that rely on their brand reputation alone will likely fail in their education efforts. When it comes to education, adequate promotion and advertisement is essential. Marketing and promotion of education programs has changed dramatically in just the past 2 - 3 years. Mark Johnson FAIA, CKD, AIBD was a primary force behind two winners of the AIA/CES Award for Education Excellence in the product manufacturer category. Mark led the team at CertainTeed, when they first won the award twice in the late 1990’s. Mark then lead the Whirlpool Corporation architecture education program in 2009 when they won the same award. Mark indicated that with CertainTeed they originally did all the traditional types of promotion of their education courses, trade shows, printed materials, and direct mail. At Whirlpool Mark began to alter his promotion approach by cutting back some of the traditional methods, in large part due to the economy. As a replacement he added online advertisements and online sponsorship. Today Mark has gone high tech, with emphasis on social media. For Mark there are now fewer trade shows, fewer printed brochures, and fewer online advertisements. Several times a day Mark tweets online to build brand awareness with the design community and consumers. Mark lists as the big three social sites for the design industry, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Mark states that social media is like an overlay on top of all of the traditional promotional methods What once took weeks or months to plan and execute now takes hours and minutes, and he can reach both a broader audience and a highly targeted audience. Through Twitter he can promote thought leadership, industry events, and products, real time throughout the day.

To bring marketing and promotion into the present I would point you to the blog of an interactive marketing and online media expert, Elizabeth Grenier. As the Strategic Accounts Manager at Percipio, Media Elizabeth writes that there are 3 eCommerce Phrases You Should Know Using Social Media. she lists E-auction: A tool used in industrial business-to-business procurement; Web 2.0: A second generation of web-based communities such as social-networking sites, wikis, blogs, and folksonomies, which aim to facilitate creativity, collaboration, and sharing among users; and Virtual communities/Community of Practice: A group of people that primarily interact via communication media such as letters, telephone, email or Usenet rather than face to face.

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